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Best tires for the C-Max??

Tires suggestions/recommendations

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96 replies to this topic

#61 OFFLINE   pureenergi

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 11:42 AM

I guess you missed my post about getting even wear at 50psi, 64Kmi. on first set and 42Kmi. so far on second set, think I will make 70K mi. :)

 

I haven't had a braking issue in 106Kmi. I think all around performance is fine. IMO :)

 

Paul

 

I don't doubt your personal experience, but the general consensus runs toward highly inflated and hyper inflated tires wearing faster at the center.  Now, some tires have a layer under the tread that flattens out the tire even at higher pressure - not sure if ours do or not.  Also, more high speed operation might be causing your tires to be flatter and less "crowned" at speed than mine are around city streets with lots of stop and go.

 

What I know for sure is your trips and driving style must be vastly different than mine.  In 2 years, 3 months I have only put 26k miles on the car, and yours has 106k.  I'm sure you do a lot more freeway driving where the car is neither accelerating or decelerating as often or with as much force as my car.  That alone probably explains the difference in tire wear.









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#62 ONLINE   ptjones

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 12:58 PM

pureenergi "I don't doubt your personal experience, but the general consensus runs toward highly inflated and hyper inflated tires wearing faster at the center."

 

Personal experience is the main focus of this forum, our CMAX's are quite different than other cars so we have to compare our experiences with other members to come to consciences.  A lot of members are using more than 38psi in their Michelin tires getting good results.  I don't know of anyone complaining about center tire wear from over inflating, above 38psi, on this forum. :) 

 

Paul 


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#63 OFFLINE   HannahWCU

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 07:48 PM

I have to agree with Paul on tire pressure, ran mine at 46 most of their life, Got more than 60K out of the OEM's.  Regular rotation is critical though.


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#64 ONLINE   obob

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 10:04 PM

http://www.tirerack....ge.jsp?techid=1

 

It mentions that underinflation could reduce treadwear by 25%

 

No mention of reduced treadwear with overinflation.



#65 OFFLINE   stevedebi

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 10:57 AM

Back on the topic, after my experience with my Escape hybrid, I will always be using LRR tires on my C-Max. When I switched tires part way through my ownership (severe tire damage to one of the tires), the grip was exceptional, but it lost around 6% of its MPG. When the OEMs on the rear wore out, I simply replaced them all, and immediately noticed a change. The extra performance wasn't worth the MPG hit IMO.

 

Everyone has their own preferrence, of course. This was just my experience.


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#66 OFFLINE   fbov

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 11:26 AM

I don't doubt your personal experience, but the general consensus runs toward highly inflated and hyper inflated tires wearing faster at the center.  Now, some tires have a layer under the tread that flattens out the tire even at higher pressure - not sure if ours do or not....

This is what happens when technology advances... the old rules of thumb become old wives tales, which spoil into snake oil very quickly.

 

ALL our tires have " a layer under the tread that flattens out the tire even at higher pressure." That wasn't always true...

 

Once upon a time, all tires were "bias ply" tires. the tire carcass was constructed around a pair of skewed sheets of rubber bonded to fabric. The sheets were oriented so the fabric weave crossed at a specific angle to give both strength for pressure containment and flexibility. This is still a common method of making heavy-duty tires, such as agriculture and aviation. Major drawbacks are poor cornering traction and poor tread life. These are very sensitive to inflation pressure, since they are just a balloon.

 

In my youth, this began to change. There was an odd French company with a roly-poly mascot named Bibendum that made their tires differently, and always included a circumferential ply or "belt." Other tire makes studied Michelin's approach, shying away from the radical radial construction, but picking up on their tread belts.

 

The result was the bias-belted tire, a bias ply carcass with several steel or fabric belts under the tread area of the tire. These belts stiffened the tread area, making it harder to pull up the edge of the tread, as bias ply did, but this came at a cost. When pushed hard, that entire belted tread area would come up, and traction would disappear. These were hard tires to drive at the limit. At the same time, the belt stabilized the tread when rolling in a straight line, and the tread life improvement resulted in quick adoption of belted tire technology. But belts were not a cure, rather a bandage to stop the bleeding. It took some Arabs shutting off our oil to start the next revolution.

 

You see, Michelin had it right. By orienting the carcass plys in the same direction, not skewed, and perpendicular to the tread, Michelin had developed a radial tire that liked to bend. By stiffening the tread with belts, they created a tread area that was decoupled from the sidewalls, allowing a single tire to be soft in the sidewalls, for smooth ride, but stiff in the tread, for performance. They cost more to make, required different manufacturing equipment, and they were harsh on the road, when installed on cars optimized for bias ply. However, their rolling resistance, and so fuel consumption was much lower than even belted bias ply, and CAFE had just come along...

 

As a result, VERY FEW OF YOU have ever owned a car with bias ply tires. I had them on my first car, a 1970 Maverick, moving up to belted bias ply when the first one dies at 20K miles. My second car, and all since, have radials. In contrast, NASCAR is still transitioning from bias ply to radial tires, for some very good reasons.

 

Anyone remember the Firestone 500 debacle? Per the web site linked above, it was a result of making radials on the cheap, using bias-ply equipment.

 

So, no, inflating a tire above the door placard will not hurt tire life, but it remains foolish to inflate above the sidewall rating for any period of time, regardless.

 

HAve fun,

Frank


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#67 ONLINE   ptjones

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 01:02 PM

My first car,68 Mustang CS/GT w/390ci V8, 4sp had Biasply tires, they didn't last long,LOL, so I bought I think Firestone Radials and the first time I drove the car on the FWY(SoCal) it scared me to death.  I could hardly keep the car in my lane and took some time to get use to the spongy sidewall. But they did corner good, I could keep up with Corvettes on the Cloverleafs off ramps. What Fun! LOL :yahoo: 

 

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#68 OFFLINE   raadsel

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 02:44 PM

This is what happens when technology advances... the old rules of thumb become old wives tales, which spoil into snake oil very quickly.

 

ALL our tires have " a layer under the tread that flattens out the tire even at higher pressure." That wasn't always true...

 

Once upon a time, all tires were "bias ply" tires. the tire carcass was constructed around a pair of skewed sheets of rubber bonded to fabric. The sheets were oriented so the fabric weave crossed at a specific angle to give both strength for pressure containment and flexibility. This is still a common method of making heavy-duty tires, such as agriculture and aviation. Major drawbacks are poor cornering traction and poor tread life. These are very sensitive to inflation pressure, since they are just a balloon.

 

In my youth, this began to change. There was an odd French company with a roly-poly mascot named Bibendum that made their tires differently, and always included a circumferential ply or "belt." Other tire makes studied Michelin's approach, shying away from the radical radial construction, but picking up on their tread belts.

 

The result was the bias-belted tire, a bias ply carcass with several steel or fabric belts under the tread area of the tire. These belts stiffened the tread area, making it harder to pull up the edge of the tread, as bias ply did, but this came at a cost. When pushed hard, that entire belted tread area would come up, and traction would disappear. These were hard tires to drive at the limit. At the same time, the belt stabilized the tread when rolling in a straight line, and the tread life improvement resulted in quick adoption of belted tire technology. But belts were not a cure, rather a bandage to stop the bleeding. It took some Arabs shutting off our oil to start the next revolution.

 

You see, Michelin had it right. By orienting the carcass plys in the same direction, not skewed, and perpendicular to the tread, Michelin had developed a radial tire that liked to bend. By stiffening the tread with belts, they created a tread area that was decoupled from the sidewalls, allowing a single tire to be soft in the sidewalls, for smooth ride, but stiff in the tread, for performance. They cost more to make, required different manufacturing equipment, and they were harsh on the road, when installed on cars optimized for bias ply. However, their rolling resistance, and so fuel consumption was much lower than even belted bias ply, and CAFE had just come along...

 

As a result, VERY FEW OF YOU have ever owned a car with bias ply tires. I had them on my first car, a 1970 Maverick, moving up to belted bias ply when the first one dies at 20K miles. My second car, and all since, have radials. In contrast, NASCAR is still transitioning from bias ply to radial tires, for some very good reasons.

 

Anyone remember the Firestone 500 debacle? Per the web site linked above, it was a result of making radials on the cheap, using bias-ply equipment.

 

So, no, inflating a tire above the door placard will not hurt tire life, but it remains foolish to inflate above the sidewall rating for any period of time, regardless.

 

HAve fun,

Frank

 

I don't think anyone here was recommending pressure above what the sidewall is rated. The tires that seem to come with all of our C-Maxes are rated at 52 psi on the sidewall, and it seems like most here don't recommend about 50 psi. Of course, that is far higher than what Ford recommends on the door panel, which is 38 psi -- likely a primary reason for this is to give the C-Max a softer ride. It could also be for safety reasons, in case they had supply issues, and swapped out with the other Michelin Energy Savers that only recommend 44 (as I recall) on the sidewall.

 

Of course, inflating over the maximum on the sidewall is dangerous, as well as over loading the tire's load rating (which is factored into the car's load capacities). Driving faster than the speed rating of the tire is also bad, but likely isn't an issue with the C-Max).

 

I suspect, with the stock Michelin tire's (ensuring it is rated to 52psi on the sidewall) that we are safe inflating between 38-50 psi -- wherever the ride and mpg is where the owner is happy with it -- and then check the tire pressure frequently.


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#69 OFFLINE   pureenergi

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 12:29 PM

OK, seems like high inflation pressures (at least to the max sidewall) don't have an effect here.  I'm at 48 right now out of respect for the tire plug (looks like they took the tire off the rim so I hope it's a mushroom plug from the inside) and taking a ~500 mile round trip road trip this weekend.

 

I ended up rotating the tires myself in the driveway to put the 4/32s rear tires up front and the 2-3/32nds front tires in back.  This should allow me to get to the next time Costco has the Michelin deal (in 2 months) and when it starts to get rainy here in NorCal and I will really want new tires.  Had a fun time doing it, and made myself a nice wooden jack puck to fit around the pinch weld.  To avoid crossposting here's the link:

 

http://fordcmaxhybri...tation/?p=59891


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#70 OFFLINE   MacGyver

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Posted 10 November 2016 - 08:48 AM

I have 58k on the OEMS and it's time, wear indicators are level with the tread.

My 2 cents re the V rating/ie; 100 MPH+; coming back from Vegas I had to get my wife to Firestone to pick up her car before like 4-5 o'clock, and so I probably AVERAGED a hundred miles an hour over the course of 4 to 5 hours, with speeds maxing out at 120-140mph... I have done the math and the extra couple hundred dollars a year I would spend to drive the car in a fun way is worth it to me...

It's really funny to me to be able to blow by those "Regulators" who try and force people to go 65mph, you know the type- they'll Cruise along in the fast lane at 65mph right to the left of someone in the right lane and try and prevent you from passing them, so I would slowly creep up until I was within Striking Distance (nothing to worry about here, just a wimpy little HYBRID, <heh> the regulator THINKS; obviously he can block that feeble hybrid if they try and pass, and then, dun dun DUN...) and then floor it and the cmax would just pile up the revs and ZOOM by them, NO possibility of them catching/©blocking you, whether they were a BMW, rice racer, or whatever supposedly "high performance car"...

I try and use my powers responsibly and not make people feel bad about their cars, (my wife has a 2016 base model Mustang that I want to race just to find out who's faster, but I don't want to make her feel bad so...) but I have little Mercy for BMW drivers/aholes. They deserve what they get by and large.

So for me I definitely need the V rating, as 100mph+ DOES happen occasionally... not often, but I do relish driving at 66-67 miles an hour, just dawdling along like the old man I am until someone's driving is so poor or impolite that I feel they need to be taught a lesson (or if letting them pass me means I will have to wait 20 minutes before I can get past them and go the speed that I want to go again) and then I'll just bust out with it, pass them like they are standing still, and go right back over into the right lane and peg the cruise control at 65.1 miles an hour, then look at them like "you're acting like a dickhead, how about sharing the road so I don't have to spank you again, there's a good lad" as they pass...

Edited by MacGyver, 10 November 2016 - 12:33 PM.


#71 OFFLINE   MacGyver

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Posted 10 November 2016 - 09:11 AM

Oh and for what it's worth on my wife's previous car a 2004 Honda Accord Costco tires absolutely sucked out loud.

One time we got a quarter inch thick (shaft) bolt that punctured her Tire, big ole half inch wide hexagon bolt head sticking out of her Tire. That's some pretty weak rubber.

Sure, they give you a road warranty and will repair them as you either sit there and wait for 2 to 3 hours or more likely go in and shop and make them more money... we had so many punctures with Costco tires I lost count at least like 5 or 6 it got ridiculous so we swore off of them, Costco batteries are weak too and they won't install them for you so I had to do it myself which on a 2004 Honda is a ridiculous process: you have to remove the left front headlight in order to get the battery in there, takes like at least 30-45 minutes once I got it down but it has taken up to an hour because it's such a stupid jigsaw space saving puzzle.

And the quote unquote warranty on the battery was no warranty at all in that when I took it back they have charged me one time because the price on the battery went up.

I asked why are you charging me more since I have the warranty? They replied that well the price went up on it so we have to charge you the difference.

I replied well then that's not a warranty that's you selling me 5 years of battery use on a subscription if you're charging me every time I have to bring your weak-ass battery back and put it in myself which takes about 45 minutes to an hour.

They got me out of there very quickly before anyone else could wander by and hear what the problems were with Costco Tires and Batteries...

Edited by MacGyver, 10 November 2016 - 09:13 AM.


#72 OFFLINE   MacGyver

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Posted 10 November 2016 - 12:23 PM

Oh and I was quite surprised and happy to see that I still got 30 miles per gallon average for that crazy fast return from Vegas trip.

So yeah I'm okay with going really fast and still getting "only" 30 miles per gallon

#73 OFFLINE   MacGyver

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Posted 10 November 2016 - 12:26 PM

haha I just thought of another tip if you get pulled over you might want to reset your average miles per gallon display, mine's about 37 right now despite the fact that if I really put my mind to it I can get 40 to 45 which if you get pulled over a cop might look at that and come to one of two conclusions; either you're really really crappy at driving a hybrid, or that you sometimes drive like a maniac

Edited by MacGyver, 10 November 2016 - 12:28 PM.


#74 OFFLINE   fbov

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Posted 12 November 2016 - 12:47 PM

... mine's about 37 right now ...a cop might look at that and come to one of two conclusions; ...

Only if he owns a hybrid... I think you're safe in Nevada. 



#75 OFFLINE   Chodatus

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 02:33 PM

Alright it's 2017, still rolling in my 2013 Cmax.

Any new recommendations for tires?

I find the OEM's too loud, especially compared to my x-ice 3's. I think I'd rather a quieter tire, or is it that the OEM's are at the end of its life...



#76 OFFLINE   homestead

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 03:48 PM

I would also go for a quieter tire too as long as the mpg's didn't suffer but for now
my tires only have about 30k on them so they can wait a little longer.

Edited by homestead, 18 February 2017 - 11:47 AM.


#77 OFFLINE   AS2014

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 11:13 AM

I have 2013 CMax that is now 4 years old with 65000 miles with the org tires. I have brought my car in and had my tires rotated every 5000 miles , kept my tire pressure at 40 psi and those tires still have half of tread life left , this was told to me by my service dept manager when asking about buying new tires. My mileage today for my car is now 48 mpg, I think you overflating your tires to get better mileage is dangerous to you and your family.

Edited by AS2014, 18 February 2017 - 11:16 AM.


#78 OFFLINE   joshg678

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Posted 20 February 2017 - 08:38 PM

I've been running about 42 psi but expect it to be lowered to 38 when I take it in

#79 OFFLINE   Britishrocco

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Posted 24 March 2017 - 01:58 PM

any one driving Continental PURE CONTACT on their C-max? about to pull the trigger on a set and am not sure between those and the Michelin? review are good, even better than the Michelin.

 

any thought



#80 ONLINE   ptjones

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 07:04 PM

From the TireRack review Michelins get the best MPG's and several high MPG's cars use them. I got 64k+ miles on two sets. :)

 

Paul








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